Creating the Witness: Documenting Genocide on Film, Video, and the Internet (Visible Evidence)

Read Creating the Witness: Documenting Genocide on Film, Video, and the Internet (Visible Evidence) PDF by Leshu Torchin eBook or Kindle ePUB Online free. Creating the Witness: Documenting Genocide on Film, Video, and the Internet (Visible Evidence) if they are not in the least bit crazy and are always tactical - the unpopular denials have to be about something important It is true that a bizarre strain of World War II denial has been increasing from some of Tokyos bywaters, and Japan continues to baffle many observers by questioning the exact status of Korean comfort women or its history and intent in the 1930s]

Creating the Witness: Documenting Genocide on Film, Video, and the Internet (Visible Evidence)

Author :
Rating : 4.48 (866 Votes)
Asin : 0816676232
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 296 Pages
Publish Date : 2015-12-22
Language : English

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"Stunning, urgent, forceful, and necessary, "Creating the Witness" exorcises the ghostly and ghastly representations of genocide and pushes them beyond the graveyards and the archives of trauma. This magnificent, grounded, and rigorously researched book boldly probes a century of imaging genocides in Armenia, Germany, Rwanda, the Balkans, the Philippines, the United States, and Darfur across photography, documentary, popular culture narrative films, user-generated media, and gaming. Leshu Torchin guts how we see and think about genocide: no longer spectres or spectacles, those images of the dead from across the globe animate dynamic ethical engagements, converting horrified reactions into collective action." --Patricia R. Zimmermann, author of "States of Emergency: Documentaries, Wars, Democracies"

Leshu Torchin is lecturer in film studies at the University of St. Andrews.

Torchin presents wide-ranging examples of witnessing and genocide, including the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust (engaging film as witness in the context of the Nuremburg trials), and the international human rights organization WITNESS and its sustained efforts to use video to publicize human rights advocacy and compel action.From a historical and comparative approach, Torchin’s broad survey of media and the social practices around it investigates the development of popular understandings of genocide to achieve recognition and response—both political and judicial—ultimately calling on viewers to act on behalf of human rights.. The book asks, how do visual media work to produce witnesses—audiences who are drawn into action? The argument is a detailed critique of the notion that there is a seamless trajectory from observing an atrocity to acting in order to intervene. According to Leshu Torchin, it is not enough to have a camera; images of genocide require an ideological framework to reinforce the messages the images are meant to convey. Since the beginning of the conflict in 2003, more than 300,000 lives have been lost in Darfur. Players of the video game Da

if they are not in the least bit crazy and are always tactical - the unpopular denials have to be about something important "It is true that a bizarre strain of World War II denial has been increasing from some of Tokyo's bywaters, and Japan continues to baffle many observers by questioning the exact status of Korean comfort women or its history and intent in the 1930s"