Disease Maps: Epidemics on the Ground

Read [Tom Koch Book] Disease Maps: Epidemics on the Ground Online PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free. Disease Maps: Epidemics on the Ground How Maps Fight Disease, or Fail To When there was a recent lethal breakout of e-coli in Germany, the great question was, Where is the germ coming from? It was time for epidemiological maps, tools that would chart disease and place so that we could get some answers. It was tough to do; such maps require data from many sources. Even so, good maps could do nothing to prevent nationalistic finger-pointing; remember the Germans initially blamed Spanish cucumbers? Eventually, the maps, and countless

Disease Maps: Epidemics on the Ground

Author :
Rating : 4.89 (502 Votes)
Asin : 0226449351
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 344 Pages
Publish Date : 2017-08-21
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

“In Disease Maps, University of British Columbia medical geographer Tom Koch explores the rich history of using maps to visualize epidemics, from early attempts to chart the menace of plague as it raced across medieval Europe and John Snow’s iconic cholera maps of the 19th century to modern-day depictions of cancer clusters and the spread of AIDS. Festooned with great old illustrations, maps, diagrams, and charts from outbreaks past, Disease Maps urges the reader to witness the genius and folly of the past in order to better map the epidemics of the future.”

Finally, Koch addresses contemporary outbreaks such as AIDS, cancer, and H1N1, and reaches into the future, toward the coming epidemics. Moving on to the scourge of the nineteenth century—cholera—Koch considers the many choleras argued into existence by the maps of the day, including a new perspective on John Snow’s science and legacy. In the nineteenth century, maps of cholera cases were used to prove its waterborne nature. More recently, maps charting the swine flu pandemic caused worldwide panic and sent shockwaves through the medical community. Koch then traces the early history of medical cartography, including pandemics such as European plague and yellow fever, and the advancements in anatomy, printing, and

How Maps Fight Disease, or Fail To When there was a recent lethal breakout of e-coli in Germany, the great question was, "Where is the germ coming from?" It was time for epidemiological maps, tools that would chart disease and place so that we could get some answers. It was tough to do; such maps require data from many sources. Even so, good maps could do nothing to prevent nationalistic finger-pointing; remember the Germans initially blamed Spanish cucumbers? Eventually, the maps, and countless other data fro. Not a book of maps, but a book about maps Bruce Bender This is a fascinating look at the evolution of mapping as a tool for fighting disease. It clearly discusses the various assumptions behind different approaches to disease mapping, their evolution over time, and the necessary "bureaucracies" that evolved to support increasing statistical sophistication.Having said that, it is a bit disappointing. The maps are too small to see, and the enlargement call-outs often confusing or mis-labelled. For a book about graphics, it is just . am said Somewhat disappointing. This book would do with a bit more of edition. It has several typos, most of them in the figures, which by the way sport a quite obsolete look. The maps, which are beautiful, are too small. The text refers to details in the maps that cannot be identified because the maps are undersized.The order in the text is not easy to understand. The author brings up names of critics or writers that he will use in a single trivial sentence and never again. These two elements do not help m

OTHER BOOK COLLECTION