Do You Remember Me?: A Father, a Daughter, and a Search for the Self

[Judith Levine] ↠ Do You Remember Me?: A Father, a Daughter, and a Search for the Self á Download Online eBook or Kindle ePUB. Do You Remember Me?: A Father, a Daughter, and a Search for the Self Jennieg said This book is an invaluable resource. This is a great book in understanding dementia. In fact, I ordered a copy for my youngest daughter whos dealing with my ex-husbands senility. Its extremely helpful for anyone dealing with a partner, family member or friend who seems increasingly disoriented. Especially when people are living longer lives and approximately 50% of people in their 80s suffer from dementia. But the discussions also raise other important issues. For example, the a

Do You Remember Me?: A Father, a Daughter, and a Search for the Self

Author :
Rating : 4.30 (824 Votes)
Asin : 1451646119
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Publish Date : 2013-03-30
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

Jennieg said This book is an invaluable resource. This is a great book in understanding dementia. In fact, I ordered a copy for my youngest daughter who's dealing with my ex-husband's senility. It's extremely helpful for anyone dealing with a partner, family member or friend who seems increasingly disoriented. Especially when people are living longer lives and approximately 50% of people in their 80's suffer from dementia. But the discussions also raise other important issues. For example, the author quotes historian Jesse Ballenger 'we may be reducing old age itself into a spiritless, managed . Barb F. said a good memoir written on a tough subject. I really got into this memoir--when I wasn't really sure what I was going to be getting intoexcept to say it was about her father's decent into Alzheimer's Disease.. "Why You Should Read Levine's Story about Dementia" according to A Customer. I got a great deal out of reading Levine's fascinating book about her father's dementia. It made such compelling reading that the book was hard to put down. What I especially admired was Levine's skillful combining of autobiographical detail and informed discussion of dementia. The two aspects of the book flowed into each other: the autobiographical details provide evidence for Levine's take on debates about dementia. She's fully informed about these debates having read both neuroscientists and psychologists and more on the issue. She is thus ab

In her award-winning Harmful to Minors, Judith Levine radically disturbed our fixed ideas about childhood. The book is both the memoir of a daughter coming to terms with a difficult father who is sinking into dementia and an insightful exploration of the ways we think about disability, aging, and the self as it resides in the body and the world. What creates a self and keeps it whole? Levine insists that only the collaboration of others can safeguard her father's self against the riddling of his brain. Now, the poignantly personal Do You Remember Me? tackles the other end of life. As her father deteriorates, the family consensus about who he was and is and how best to care for him constantly threatens to collapse. She unpeels the layers of his complicated personality and uncovers information that s

She explicates the mind/body issues inherent in Alzheimer's from multiple perspectives, invoking a host of psychologists and scientists. All rights reserved. Everything disintegrates for Levine's father, a psychologist and liberal political activist, after his Alzheimer's diagnosis. She makes herself examine her relationship with her father (which has always been fraught) and her mother (whom she resents for leaving her ill father for another man). Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. This is a daughter's poignant homage to a father she came to know best after he lost his mind, but it's also a searing indictment of how America treats its disabled and a cautionary tale for aging baby boomers. Levine, a natural storyteller and author of the controversial Harmful to Minors: The Perils of Protecting Children from Sex, presents more than a tale abo

Judith Levine's work explores the ways history, culture, and politics express themselves in intimate life. She is the writer of scores of articles for national magazines and four books, including Harmful to Minors: The Perils of Protecting Children from Sex, which won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Levine lives in Brooklyn, New York, and Hardwick, Vermont, where she writes the column "Poli Psy," on the public uses of emotion, for the

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