Fred Barton and the Warlords' Horses of China: How an American Cowboy Brought the Old West to the Far East

* Read # Fred Barton and the Warlords Horses of China: How an American Cowboy Brought the Old West to the Far East by Larry Weirather ½ eBook or Kindle ePUB. Fred Barton and the Warlords Horses of China: How an American Cowboy Brought the Old West to the Far East Barton later assembled a group of American rodeo stars and drove horses across Mongolia for the war-lords of northern China, creating a 250,000 acre ranch in Shanxi Province. In the years before World War I, Montana cowboy Fred Barton was employed by Czar Nicholas II to help establish a horse ranch--the largest in the world--in Siberia to supply the Russian military. Returning to America, he married one of the wealthiest widows in the Southwest and hobnobbed with Western film stars at a time whe

Fred Barton and the Warlords' Horses of China: How an American Cowboy Brought the Old West to the Far East

Author :
Rating : 4.49 (607 Votes)
Asin : 0786499133
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 236 Pages
Publish Date : 2015-11-26
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

About the AuthorLarry Weirather lives in Vancouver, Washington, and is a professor emeritus of popular culture at Clark College. . He has published articles in The Journal of Popular Culture and The Popular Culture Review and served as editor for various literary magazines

"Wort the read" according to JT. Worth the readVery interesting life. B. Cawley said A Story of Montana and China and Horses. An epic may be described ass a prose narrative which recounts the deeds of a legendary person. Such may be applied to Larry Weirather's nonfiction piece, Fred Barton and the Warlords' Horses of China. While not exactly legendary, Fred Barton certainly made his mark on the histories of two continents. The subtitle of the work gives some slight indication of that fact - How an American Cowboy Brought the Old West to the Far East. Given the author's b. An epic story brought out of the shadows Ah, such days of high adventure. This is a fantastic hitherto-untold story. I've read more than a hundred books on China and not come across this subject before. The previous reviewer has a point about the chapters dealing with Barton post-1937 (when he left China) as they are less interesting, but this is a minor quibble compared to what the author has uncovered and the incredible story he has told.The book gives a wonderful panorama of China duri

Larry Weirather lives in Vancouver, Washington, and is a professor emeritus of popular culture at Clark College. . He has published articles in The Journal of Popular Culture and The Popular Culture Review and served as editor for various literary magazines

Barton later assembled a group of American rodeo stars and drove horses across Mongolia for the war-lords of northern China, creating a 250,000 acre ranch in Shanxi Province. In the years before World War I, Montana cowboy Fred Barton was employed by Czar Nicholas II to help establish a horse ranch--the largest in the world--in Siberia to supply the Russian military. Returning to America, he married one of the wealthiest widows in the Southwest and hobnobbed with Western film stars at a time when Hollywood was constructing the modern myth of the Old West, just as open range cowboy life was disappearing.. intelligence network in the Far East, bred a new type of horse from Russian, Mongolian and American stock and promoted the lifestyle of the open range cowboy. Along the way, Barton became part of an unofficial U.S

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