Funnybooks: The Improbable Glories of the Best American Comic Books

Read Funnybooks: The Improbable Glories of the Best American Comic Books PDF by Michæl Barrier eBook or Kindle ePUB Online free. Funnybooks: The Improbable Glories of the Best American Comic Books Five Stars according to Charles Burton. GREAT BOOK. Essential for fans of REALLY Good comics according to Christopher Barat. What Michael Barrier did for the history of classic Hollywood studio animation in HOLLYWOOD CARTOONS, he does here for the golden years of Dell Comics and its most accomplished and historically significant creators -- Walt Kelly, John Stanley, and, above all, Carl Barks. While devoting most of his critical attention to this trio of greats and the ways in which they h

Funnybooks: The Improbable Glories of the Best American Comic Books

Author :
Rating : 4.74 (831 Votes)
Asin : 0520241185
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 432 Pages
Publish Date : 2014-09-13
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

Lent"CHOICE" (07/01/2015)" . A. Written with clarity, expressiveness, and enthusiasm, this is a book for scholars, historians, practitioners, and fans old and new."--J. Barrier, whose previous works include a history of the Hollywood animated film as well as an excellent biography of Walt Disney, has set out to write a business history of Dell Comics. Barrier draws on interviews, archives and his own astute knowledge of comics." --Will Friedwald"Wall Street Journal" (03/06/2015)"Barrier re-immerses himself in classic comic books and emerges impervious to nostalgia."--Paul Gravett"Times Literary Supplement" (04/03/2015)""Funnybooks"is the crowning achievement of Barrier's illustrious career. "Comics historian Bar

"Five Stars" according to Charles Burton. GREAT BOOK. "Essential for fans of REALLY "Good" comics" according to Christopher Barat. What Michael Barrier did for the history of classic Hollywood studio animation in HOLLYWOOD CARTOONS, he does here for the golden years of Dell Comics and its most accomplished and historically significant creators -- Walt Kelly, John Stanley, and, above all, Carl Barks. While devoting most of his critical attention to this trio of greats and the ways in which they helped shape the development of the American comic book into an art form with its own distinct verbal and visual language, Barrier also unearths facts and highlights overlooke. the book itself is excellent. It tells the history of Dell comics even This is a review of the Kindle edition of this book. First of all, the book itself is excellent. It tells the history of Dell comics even as it concentrates on the best Dell had to offer. It is "scholarly" without being dry. It is also precise and obviously well researched and vetted. The writing is engaging and kept me interested and anxious to read the next chapter despite the fact that it is long (the information section here says the book itself is excellent. It tells the history of Dell comics even r4man This is a review of the Kindle edition of this book. First of all, the book itself is excellent. It tells the history of Dell comics even as it concentrates on the best Dell had to offer. It is "scholarly" without being dry. It is also precise and obviously well researched and vetted. The writing is engaging and kept me interested and anxious to read the next chapter despite the fact that it is long (the information section here says 432 pages, though the Kindle edition does not give page numbers, only location numbers) and has only a fe. 32 pages, though the Kindle edition does not give page numbers, only location numbers) and has only a fe

It was all but miraculous that a few great cartoonists were able to look past that nearly universal scorn and grasp the artistic potential of their medium. Many of the stories written and drawn by people like Carl Barks (Donald Duck, Uncle Scrooge), John Stanley (Little Lulu), and Walt Kelly (Pogo) repay reading and rereading by educated adults even today, decades after they were published as disposable entertainment for children. Funnybooks is the story of the most popular American comic books of the 1940s and 1950s, those published under the Dell label. Such triumphs were improbable, to say the least, because midcentury comics were so widely dismissed as trash by angry parents, indignant librarians, and even many of the people who published them. For a time, Dell Comics Are Good Comics” was more than a sloganit was a simple statement of fact. With clarity and enthusiasm, Barrier explains what made the best stories in the Dell comic books so special. He deftly turns a complex and detailed history into an expressive narrative sure to appeal to an audience beyond scholars and historians.

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