Just a Dog: Understanding Animal Cruelty and Ourselves (Animals, Culture, and Society)

[Arnold Arluke] ✓ Just a Dog: Understanding Animal Cruelty and Ourselves (Animals, Culture, and Society) ✓ Download Online eBook or Kindle ePUB. Just a Dog: Understanding Animal Cruelty and Ourselves (Animals, Culture, and Society) interesting according to catclan. very interesting read. nice size book and great information. Thank you. A Must Read for Animal Rights Advocates according to D_shrink. The author does a good job of presenting a fairly balanced description of what constitutes animal abuse, who does it, and why they do it.Among the relevant points presented are:1. [W]orkers in animal laboratories or slaughterhouses, for example, are thought to undergo desensitization as a coping mechanism. P82. [SPCA] agen

Just a Dog: Understanding Animal Cruelty and Ourselves (Animals, Culture, and Society)

Author :
Rating : 4.42 (913 Votes)
Asin : 1592134726
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 232 Pages
Publish Date : 2015-10-12
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

"interesting" according to catclan. very interesting read. nice size book and great information. Thank you. "A Must Read for Animal Rights Advocates" according to D_shrink. The author does a good job of presenting a fairly balanced description of what constitutes animal abuse, who does it, and why they do it.Among the relevant points presented are:1. "[W]orkers in animal laboratories or slaughterhouses, for example, are thought to undergo desensitization as a coping mechanism." P82. "[SPCA] agents think of professionalism as an ability to maintain emotional distance form cases." PA Must Read for Animal Rights Advocates D_shrink The author does a good job of presenting a fairly balanced description of what constitutes animal abuse, who does it, and why they do it.Among the relevant points presented are:1. "[W]orkers in animal laboratories or slaughterhouses, for example, are thought to undergo desensitization as a coping mechanism." P82. "[SPCA] agents think of professionalism as an ability to maintain emotional distance form cases." P433. Adolescents who engage in. A Must Read for Animal Rights Advocates The author does a good job of presenting a fairly balanced description of what constitutes animal abuse, who does it, and why they do it.Among the relevant points presented are:1. "[W]orkers in animal laboratories or slaughterhouses, for example, are thought to undergo desensitization as a coping mechanism." P82. "[SPCA] agents think of professionalism as an ability to maintain emotional distance form cases." PA Must Read for Animal Rights Advocates D_shrink The author does a good job of presenting a fairly balanced description of what constitutes animal abuse, who does it, and why they do it.Among the relevant points presented are:1. "[W]orkers in animal laboratories or slaughterhouses, for example, are thought to undergo desensitization as a coping mechanism." P82. "[SPCA] agents think of professionalism as an ability to maintain emotional distance form cases." P433. Adolescents who engage in. 33. Adolescents who engage in. A Must Read for Animal Rights Advocates The author does a good job of presenting a fairly balanced description of what constitutes animal abuse, who does it, and why they do it.Among the relevant points presented are:1. "[W]orkers in animal laboratories or slaughterhouses, for example, are thought to undergo desensitization as a coping mechanism." P82. "[SPCA] agents think of professionalism as an ability to maintain emotional distance form cases." PA Must Read for Animal Rights Advocates D_shrink The author does a good job of presenting a fairly balanced description of what constitutes animal abuse, who does it, and why they do it.Among the relevant points presented are:1. "[W]orkers in animal laboratories or slaughterhouses, for example, are thought to undergo desensitization as a coping mechanism." P82. "[SPCA] agents think of professionalism as an ability to maintain emotional distance form cases." P433. Adolescents who engage in. 33. Adolescents who engage in. . Adolescents who engage in. lngarrison said Great background about animal shelter workers. I was doing a research paper on animal shelters and while trying to understand the euthanasia debate, Arluke gave great unbaised research especially about the choices animal shelter workers must make when working at an open admissions shelter.Although extremely informative, it should be updated (i.e., Utah is not an entire state of 'no kill' policies, although it is striving to do so).

But Arluke's academic approach and language are off-putting, thwarting his objective of stimulating discussion and debate among the general public about the nature of animal cruelty and the importance of finding new ways to deal with it. (July)Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. In this dense and overly long sociological study, he reports on the results of interviews with five groups of people: law enforcement agents who investigate incidents of abuse, adolescent animal abusers, animal hoarders, animal shelter workers (including those who must sometimes euthanize animals as well as those who believe no animal should ever be killed) and public relations experts who use animal cruelty as a marketing tool for fund-raising and education. . From Publishers Weekly Arluke (Regarding Animals), an authority on animal cruelty, believes that in order to formulate effective programs and policies to combat such behavior, society must have a

In each case, cruelty's meaning reflects the practical, personal, and ideological concerns of these groups and the wider social and cultural confusion over the nature and significance of animals and their proper treatment. In Just a Dog, Arnold Arluke argues that animal cruelty must be understood in terms of social relationships rather than an individual's psychological problem or personality disorder. Arluke situates cruelty in actual situations where groups of people decide, on their own terms, what constitutes the wrongful harm of animals and how best to communicate their understanding to others. He captures how law enforcement agents, shelter workers, humane marketers, the general public, and animal abusers (or neglecters), make sense of animal cruelty. He shows that these divergent definitions are not mere reflections of the social world but are actively created and used by group members to achieve sought-after identities.

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