Listening to Whales: What the Orcas Have Taught Us

Read [Alexandra Morton Book] Listening to Whales: What the Orcas Have Taught Us Online PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free. Listening to Whales: What the Orcas Have Taught Us She did much more than listen. A psychologist This well written book describes the authors fascination with all animals and her willingness to travel far to observe and research killer whales. In addition to providing her history and knowledge of the whales, her use of language is delightful.. Neil Frazer said Eyes of the Raincoast. This is the autobiography (so far) of whale researcher Alexandra Morton who came to the remote Broughton Archipelago in 198Eyes of the Raincoast Neil Frazer This is

Listening to Whales: What the Orcas Have Taught Us

Author :
Rating : 4.71 (555 Votes)
Asin : 0345437942
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Publish Date : 2013-04-20
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

She did much more than listen. A psychologist This well written book describes the author's fascination with all animals and her willingness to travel far to observe and research killer whales. In addition to providing her history and knowledge of the whales, her use of language is delightful.. Neil Frazer said Eyes of the Raincoast. This is the autobiography (so far) of whale researcher Alexandra Morton who came to the remote Broughton Archipelago in 198Eyes of the Raincoast Neil Frazer This is the autobiography (so far) of whale researcher Alexandra Morton who came to the remote Broughton Archipelago in 1984 to study orcas and was herself woven by nature into the warp and woof of that amazing place. While telling a fascinating story the book imparts a great deal of knowledge in so painless a manner that we hardly notice. We learn, for example, that there are three kinds of orcas: "residents," who eat mostly fish; "transients" who eat mostly seals and sea lions; and "offshores" who--nobody knows for sure--may well eat mostly sharks. Though whales, both captive and free, are t. to study orcas and was herself woven by nature into the warp and woof of that amazing place. While telling a fascinating story the book imparts a great deal of knowledge in so painless a manner that we hardly notice. We learn, for example, that there are three kinds of orcas: "residents," who eat mostly fish; "transients" who eat mostly seals and sea lions; and "offshores" who--nobody knows for sure--may well eat mostly sharks. Though whales, both captive and free, are t. Loved it L. Haverstock I didn't realize until I read the book how drawn I am to marine biology esp. whales. She starts in Malibu with Dr. Lilly and moves to the old Marineland where she listens herself and ends up on Vancouver Island where pods were just beginning to be studied.I expected something more New Age. She sticks to well-documented ideas about orca's social behavior. When she feels things beyond what is scientificly proved, she says that this is what she felt and you feel for someone who has devoted this much time and thought to these animals her observations are not inappropriate. This is now one of my fa

Morton's rich descriptions of individual orca movements, and how each relates to the species as a whole, course alongside her passionate defense of the ecological balance of the region; she infuses both with just the right amount of personal reflection to make this an engaging tale of a woman's commitment to science and a life well lived. Inspired by Jane Goodall as an important but rare model, she soon decided to find wild orcas to record launching her lifelong study of the animals in the coastal waters of British Columbia.

Now in Listening to Whales, Morton shares the spellbinding story of her career, her adventures in the wilderness, the heartbreak she has endured, and the rewards of living her life on her own terms.Born into an artistic family in Connecticut, Morton experienced a seismic jolt when at age twelve she first read the work of primatologist Dr. She recorded the varied language of mating, childbirth, and even grief after the birth of a stillborn calf. In 19784, Alexandra moved with her husband, photographer Robin Morton, to a remote bay in British Columbia to continue her research with wild orcas. For the past twenty-five years, Alexandra Morton has been at the forefront of whale and dolphin research, dedicating her life to the study of orcas (also known as killer whales). At the same time she made the startling observation that the whales were inventing and perfecting wonderful synchronized movements, a behavior that was soon recognized as a defining characteristic of orca society. Her recordings of the whales that swim by her house have led her to a deeper understanding of the mystery of whale echolocation, the vocal communication that enables the mammals to find their way in the dark sea. For a few idyllic years, Alexandra and Robin shared their passion for whales, cruising the green northern waters and raising a baby boy. Jane Goodall and knew she wanted to study wild anim

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