My Lunches with Orson: Conversations between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles

! Read ! My Lunches with Orson: Conversations between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles by Peter Biskind ✓ eBook or Kindle ePUB. My Lunches with Orson: Conversations between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles Ranging from politics to literature to the shortcomings of his friends and the many films he was still eager to launch, Welles is at once cynical and romantic, sentimental and raunchy, but never boring and always wickedly funny.Edited by Peter Biskind, Americas foremost film historian, My Lunches with Orson reveals one of the giants of the twentieth century, a man struggling with reversals, bitter and angry, desperate for one last triumph, but crackling with wit and a restless intelligen

My Lunches with Orson: Conversations between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles

Author :
Rating : 4.48 (955 Votes)
Asin : 1250051703
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 336 Pages
Publish Date : 2014-02-26
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

--Ben Segedin . From Booklist When his first film, Citizen Kane, was released, Welles had already achieved fame in theater and radio. These recordings reveal Welles, the raconteur, as he recalls lovers (Rita Hayworth, Lena Horne); disses actors and directors (John Houseman, Joan Fontaine, Chaplin); tells outlandish stories (Carole Lombard’s plane was shot down by Nazi agents in America); and bemoans lack of respect from his peers. He followed Kane with several masterpieces, including The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) and Touch of Evil (1958) and was famous as Harry Lime in The Third Man (1949). A worthy addition to the Bogdanovich, Leaming, and Callow accounts of Welles. By the 1980s, his films already classics, he hadn’t made a new film in nearly a decade, making it impossible to get funding for future projects, which led to lending his voice to wine commercials. F

Peter Biskind is the acclaimed author of Easy Riders, Raging Bulls, Down and Dirty Pictures, and Star, among other books. He lives in upstate New York.. He is the former executive editor of Premiere and the former editor in chief of American Film, and is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair. His work has appeared in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, The Nation, and Rolling Stone
I finally felt like letting out a primal scream of "Enough already For Truth In Advertising Intriguing & interesting, but after 75 pages, I just got sick of Orson complaining and bitching about everything. Seriously, as witty as he was, I finally felt like letting out a primal scream of "Enough already!" I will say this: a little of Orson goes a loooooong way.. A priceless gift Who wouldn't want to be a fly on the wall having lunches with the great Orson Welles?. Good conversation People who have read Peter Bogdanovich's THIS IS ORSON WELLES will want to read this book, too. Less a series of intentional interviews, it is, as the title tells, transcriptions of informal table talk at lunch. Welles insisted that the tape recorder be out of sight so that the conversations could be as unselfconscious as possible, and the results are nothing if not candid and opinionated--but also stimulating and insightful. Anyone who has seen an interview with Welles knows what a spellbinding talker he was, and every one of the book's 27 chapters verifies this, nearly every one of the 286 pages.

Ranging from politics to literature to the shortcomings of his friends and the many films he was still eager to launch, Welles is at once cynical and romantic, sentimental and raunchy, but never boring and always wickedly funny.Edited by Peter Biskind, America's foremost film historian, My Lunches with Orson reveals one of the giants of the twentieth century, a man struggling with reversals, bitter and angry, desperate for one last triumph, but crackling with wit and a restless intelligence. BASED ON LONG-LOST RECORDINGS, A SET OF RIVETING AND REVEALING CONVERSATIONS WITH AMERICA'S GREAT CULTURAL PROVOCATEURThere have long been rumors of a lost cache of tapes containing private conversations between Orson Welles and his friend the director Henry Jaglom, recorded over regular lunches in the years before Welles died. The tapes, gathering dust in a garage, did indeed exist, and this book reveals for the first time what they contain.Here is Welles as he has never been seen before: talking intimately, disclosing personal secrets, reflecting on the highs