Never Shower in a Thunderstorm: Surprising Facts and Misleading Myths About Our Health and the World We Live In

* Read ! Never Shower in a Thunderstorm: Surprising Facts and Misleading Myths About Our Health and the World We Live In by Anahad OConnor ✓ eBook or Kindle ePUB. Never Shower in a Thunderstorm: Surprising Facts and Misleading Myths About Our Health and the World We Live In Lacks Sources according to Charlie. About: Facts and myths about health explained. Includes such topics as Is too much sleep bad for you? (yes) and Can you swim right after eating? (also, yes)Pros: Quick read, interesting.Cons: Sources are not cited, a large downside when debunking myths or providing facts.Grade: B. George Poirier said Great Fun and Most Informative. This book was great fun to read. Many myths, legends, sayings, old wives tales, etc., all related in some way to health and

Never Shower in a Thunderstorm: Surprising Facts and Misleading Myths About Our Health and the World We Live In

Author :
Rating : 4.84 (980 Votes)
Asin : 080508312X
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Publish Date : 2017-02-01
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

He lives in New York City.. Anahad O'Connor is a reporter for The New York Times covering science, health, immigration, and life in the greater New York area and contributes the weekly column "Really?"--named for his favorite word in journalism--to the paper's Science Times section

(June)Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. While regular Times readers will remember many of these topics, the newly casual tone of the discussions will either entertain or distract, depending on one's tolerance for anecdote. O'Connor easily waxes on about whether bicycle seats cause impotence or if knuckle cracking can lead to arthritis. For instance, in exploring the infamous "Will eating poppy seeds make you fail a drug test?" conundrum, O'Connor got right to the point in his 2005 column ("a couple of bagels heavily coated with poppy seeds can result in morphine in a person's system for hours"), but here he begins with the retelling of a Seinfeld episode where E

A compendium of answers to the curious and nagging questions of how to keep healthy, Never Shower in a Thunderstorm will provide guidance and amusement to anyone who has ever wondered if the mosquitoes really are attacking her more than everyone else. Now in this lively and fun book, he opens up his case files to disclose the experts' answers on everything, from which of your bad habits you can indulge (yo-yo dieting does not mess up your metabolism and sitting too close to the television does not hurt your eyes) to what foods actually pack the punch advertised (you can lay off the beet juice!). TheNew York Times's intrepid health reporter investigates th

"Lacks Sources" according to Charlie. About: Facts and myths about health explained. Includes such topics as "Is too much sleep bad for you?" (yes) and "Can you swim right after eating?" (also, yes)Pros: Quick read, interesting.Cons: Sources are not cited, a large downside when debunking myths or providing facts.Grade: B. George Poirier said Great Fun and Most Informative. This book was great fun to read. Many myths, legends, sayings, old wives' tales, etc., all related in some way to health and life, are either debunked or confirmed - and rationales are provided. The author appears to have researched each topic quite exhaustively - not only through reviewing published papers in the scientific and medical literature but also through interviewing acknowledged experts in each field. The book's writing style is friendly, authoritative and very engaging. But what stands out the most is the author's clever wit and humor; on several occasions I found myself laughing out loud. This is a wonderful book that cou. Pretty poor book I bought this book to entertain me for a trans-pacific flight, and boy was I disappointed. Most of the questions are answered along the lines of: "Maybe, but it can't hurt to [blah]"Nothing is really backed up, and you're just supposed to trust the author. At some point in the book, it was talking about hair loss caused by tight hair styles. And it made the statement of Andre Agassi wearing hats all the time and then suddenly he was bald. So the hats must have caused him to lose his hair. Uh, maybe he wore hats because he had thinning hair?I was not happy with this purchase at all.

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