The Idealist: Aaron Swartz and the Rise of Free Culture on the Internet

* Read ^ The Idealist: Aaron Swartz and the Rise of Free Culture on the Internet by Justin Peters Ó eBook or Kindle ePUB. The Idealist: Aaron Swartz and the Rise of Free Culture on the Internet Four Stars Barbara J. Lara I enjoyed this book!. Aaron Swartz comes from a long line of Americans who according to Amazon Customer. Aaron Swartz comes from a long line of Americans who gave their careers (or lives) to freedom of information in this country. It was fascinating to read about the young Internet genius who killed himself in his context -- among others who had done the same in different eras, all of the suffering from rejection and dejection, but none of them killed by it.The story

The Idealist: Aaron Swartz and the Rise of Free Culture on the Internet

Author :
Rating : 4.36 (683 Votes)
Asin : 1476767726
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 352 Pages
Publish Date : 2014-05-24
Language : English

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Four Stars Barbara J. Lara I enjoyed this book!. "Aaron Swartz comes from a long line of Americans who" according to Amazon Customer. Aaron Swartz comes from a long line of Americans who gave their careers (or lives) to freedom of information in this country. It was fascinating to read about the young Internet genius who killed himself in his context -- among others who had done the same in different eras, all of the suffering from rejection and dejection, but none of them killed by it.The story of Swartz's life and death raises critical issues about freedom of information, but also about the criminal justice system. Would Swartz be alive today if he'd been pardoned for his crime? How many people face massive jail sentences for non-violent crimes?How much c. DrJabberwocky said Great read for anyone - not just hackers & copyright buffs. I purchased The Idealist at a book reading by the author (who, full disclosure, is a friend of mine from high school) knowing nothing about copyright law and next to nothing about Aaron Swartz.For a book about what I previously considered to be an arcane subject and a person whose story was, to me, just another fleeting headline, I was shocked by just how quickly and complelety this book enveloped me. Peters deft writing style and expertly applied wit not only held my attention, but pulled me into a fascinating world I otherwise would have known nothing about.(And yes, I realize you probably think I'm just giving my old frien

Peters also breaks down the government’s case against Swartz and explains how we reached the point where federally funded academic research came to be considered private property, and downloading that material in bulk came to be considered a federal crime.The Idealist is an important investigation of the fate of the digital commons in an increasingly corporatized Internet, and an essential look at the impact of the free culture movement on our daily lives and on generations to come.. He committed suicide in 2013 after being indicted by the government for illegally downloading millions of academic articles from a nonprofit online database. In the process, the book explores the history of copyright statutes and the public domain; examines archivists’ ongoing quest to build the “library of the future”; and charts the rise of open access, copyleft, and other ideologies that have come to challenge protectionist IP policies. A smart, lively history of the Internet free culture movement and its larger effects on society—and the life and shocking suicide of Aaron Swartz, a founding develop

Peters is somehow able to pinpoint the complex questions that our culture has to answer if we are to move forward into the future without forgetting our past." (Lisa Rein, co-founder of CreativeCommons and Aaron Swartz Day)"In powerful, clear-eyed prose, Justin Peters recounts Aaron Swartz's life story and astutely explains why that story continues to matter today. (New Republic)"Peters’ new book is an excellent survey of the intellectual property battlefield, and a sobering memorial to its most tragic victim." (The Boston Globe)“The Idealist hefts its burden of research and explanation with flair. The Idealist should be required reading for anyone who has ever shared—or who hasn't ever shared—a file on the Internet." (David Segal, executive director of Demand Progress) . Everyone should read The Idealist, if only to better understand the mounting crisis Americ

. He has written for various national publications, including The New York Times, The Washington Monthly, and Travel + Leisure, and was the founding editor of Polite, a general-interest print journal. Justin Peters is a correspondent for Slate and a contributing editor at the Columbia Journalism Review. An alumnus of Cornell University and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, he divides his time between Boston

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