Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing (MIT Press)

! Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing (MIT Press) ↠ PDF Download by # Jane Margolis, Allan Fisher eBook or Kindle ePUB Online free. Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing (MIT Press) The interviews capture the dynamic details of the female computing experience, from the family computer kept in a brothers bedroom to womens feelings of alienation in college computing classes. The book is based on interviews with more than 100 computer science students of both sexes from Carnegie Mellon University, a major center of computer science research, over a period of four years, as well as classroom observations and conversations with hundreds of college and high school faculty. The

Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing (MIT Press)

Author :
Rating : 4.44 (785 Votes)
Asin : 0262632691
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 184 Pages
Publish Date : 2013-05-11
Language : English

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The interviews capture the dynamic details of the female computing experience, from the family computer kept in a brother's bedroom to women's feelings of alienation in college computing classes. The book is based on interviews with more than 100 computer science students of both sexes from Carnegie Mellon University, a major center of computer science research, over a period of four years, as well as classroom observations and conversations with hundreds of college and high school faculty. The authors investigate the familial, educational, and institutional origins of the computing gender gap. Although women surf the Web in equal numbers to men and make a majority of online purchases, few are involved in the design and creation of new technology. As only a small fraction of high school and college computer science students are female, the field is likely to remain a "male clubhouse," absent major changes.In Unlocking the Clubhouse, social scientist Jane Margolis and computer scientist and educator Allan Fisher examine the many influences contributing to the gender gap in computing. It is mostly men whose perspectives and priorities inform the development of computing innovations and who reap the lion's share of the financial rewards. The information technology revolution is transforming almost every aspect of society, but

Lilly C. Irani said Eye-opening and relatable. This book grabbed me by the collar and shook me up. I'm a female Computer Science student and the stories in the book sounded like quotes taken from conversations between me and my friends. Margolis and Fisher describe the factors that affect the experiences of tech inclined women as they embark on and endure or exit from the Computer Science major at CMU. The writing is level-headed and socially conscious, and the experiences are told largely through the stuents' own words. It's a good read for academics, teache. "Some interesting observations, their recommendations were lacking." according to kittenchicken0Some interesting observations, their recommendations were lacking. I picked up this book because I had observed the females in my CS department (including myself) drop like flies. I was curious as to the cause of it, but there didn't seem to be a common theme, so I thought this book might have some insight. It didn't.They cited several reasons women at CM were leaving, some of which were interesting, but the one that made me put down the book and walk away was when it claimed that it was because women are nurturing, and computer science needs to change to be more about using com. 98. I picked up this book because I had observed the females in my CS department (including myself) drop like flies. I was curious as to the cause of it, but there didn't seem to be a common theme, so I thought this book might have some insight. It didn't.They cited several reasons women at CM were leaving, some of which were interesting, but the one that made me put down the book and walk away was when it claimed that it was because women are nurturing, and computer science needs to change to be more about using com. Explaining the Lack of Women in Computer Science Majors Elaine Seymour This is an important book for everyone concerned about the causes and consequences of the nation's failure to attract undergraduate women into computer science. Margolis and Fishers' well-structured, longitudinal study is the first to explore multiple dimensions of this issue in careful detail, and their findings counter causal myths (e.g., about the "natural" distribution of interest and aptitude) that can inhibit ormisdirect remedial efforts. Some roots of the recruitment problem lie in the inequities of pre-co

When there were no opportunities for women in the sciences, it was assumed they had no aptitude for the work. Convinced that "women must know more than how to use technology; they must know how to design and create it," Jane Margolis, a social scientist, and Allan Fisher, a computer scientist and college dean, devised a four-year study (involving some 230 interviews) at Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science. They found that the seven percent of female undergraduates at the college started out with as much excitement and talent as their male counterparts, but often wilted early on, perceiving that male students had come to college far better prepared than they had. --Regina Marler. "The study of computer science education can be seen as a microcosm of how a realm of power can be claimed by one group of people," the authors argue, "relegating others to outs

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