Voluntary Madness: My Year Lost and Found in the Loony Bin

Read [Norah Vincent Book] Voluntary Madness: My Year Lost and Found in the Loony Bin Online PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free. Voluntary Madness: My Year Lost and Found in the Loony Bin Determined but uncertain about maintaining her own equilibrium, she boldly committed herself to three different facilities-a big-city hospital, a private clinic in the Midwest, and finally an upscale retreat in the South. At the conclusion of her celebrated first book--Self-Made Man, in which she soent eighteen months disguised as a man-Norah Vincent found herself emotionally drained and severely depressed. From the author of The New York Times bestseller Self- Made Man

Voluntary Madness: My Year Lost and Found in the Loony Bin

Author :
Rating : 4.76 (796 Votes)
Asin : 0670019712
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 304 Pages
Publish Date : 2013-12-05
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

been done before and quite better Whats the point? & who's it meant for? I'm not sure who would be the target audience for a book that has really no point or purpose. The author appears to be making a half-hearted attempt to get some mileage out of a literary degree by sharing her sophomoric ideas about a subject she has obviously not studied or fully experienced. It's not about her own 'illness' (although that is what she implies in the title) as she doesn't ever really commit to exposing her own struggles but rather gives a preachy and perfunctory speck here and there. At one point she descri. "Bound to be controversial, but much-needed commentary" according to Ksuzy. Vincent, who is actually a genuine former involuntary patient in a mental institution, decides to return to three different institutions to study, experience, and analyze how the systems work (or don't work), and what happens to the people inside-- both patients and employees.This fact that she was a former patient gives her book an edge upon which she has had to tread lightly: If she hadn't formerly been committed, it would be easy to suggest that she didn't truly understand, because she had gone there by choice as someone who wasn't really sick. Yet, the fact. "Much needed information" according to John H. Frykman. Norah Vincent provides insight into the way psychiatry and psychiatric services are so often "barking up the wrong tree." As a psychotherapist myself, I'm often in the position of repairing the damage done by the psychiatric establishment. This book gets it right and should provide hope for many who struggle with their own feelings of hopelessness in the face of the "treatment" they are getting.John Frykman, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

The grand tour consists of voluntary commitments to a hospital mental ward, a small private facility and a boutique facility; but Vincent's efforts to make a big statement about the state of mental health treatment quickly give way to a more personal journey. An attempt to wean herself off Prozac, for example, adds a greater sense of urgency to her second research trip, while the therapists overseeing her final treatment lead her to a major emotional breakthrough. From Publishers Weekly Vincent's first trip to a mental institution—to which

Determined but uncertain about maintaining her own equilibrium, she boldly committed herself to three different facilities-a big-city hospital, a private clinic in the Midwest, and finally an upscale retreat in the South. At the conclusion of her celebrated first book--Self-Made Man, in which she soent eighteen months disguised as a man-Norah Vincent found herself emotionally drained and severely depressed. From the author of The New York Times bestseller Self- Made Man, a captivating expose of depression and mental illness in America Revelatory, deeply personal, and utterly relevant, Voluntary Madness is a

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