Welcome to the Jungle Inn: The Story of the Mafia's Most Infamous Gambling Den

* Read # Welcome to the Jungle Inn: The Story of the Mafias Most Infamous Gambling Den by Allan R. May ↠ eBook or Kindle ePUB. Welcome to the Jungle Inn: The Story of the Mafias Most Infamous Gambling Den A history of organized crime in Warren and Trumbull County, featuring stories on Jimmy Munsene, the notorious Farah Brothers, Detroit Mobster Frank Cammarata, Anthony Tony Dope Delsanger and others.]

Welcome to the Jungle Inn: The Story of the Mafia's Most Infamous Gambling Den

Author :
Rating : 4.34 (576 Votes)
Asin : 0983703736
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 314 Pages
Publish Date : 2016-01-04
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

. May is the historian at Lake View Cemetery and is on its Speaker's Bureau. The first was Mob Stories, a compilation of his columns that appeared at AmericanMafia. The second was Gangland Gotham: New York's Notorious Mob Bosses. This is May's third book. May is an organized crime historian from Cleveland, Ohio. May has taught classes on the history of organized crime at Cuyahoga Community College's Senior Adult Education Program and gives lectures throughout northeastern Ohio. May moved on to write for Rick Porello's AmericanMafia, Court TV'

"Full of information" according to Larry A. Johnson. A lot of information here, There is even a chapter on the Jungle Inn. I did find what I was looking for. May did a great deal of research. I only gave it Full of information Larry A. Johnson A lot of information here, There is even a chapter on the Jungle Inn. I did find what I was looking for. May did a great deal of research. I only gave it 4 stars because it kind of droned on for me. However, if it had not contained so much information, I may not have found what I was looking for.. stars because it kind of droned on for me. However, if it had not contained so much information, I may not have found what I was looking for.. "Excellent history of organized crime in Trumbull County" according to L. S. Reed. I grew up in Warren and was relatively aware of things. I remember hearing periodic stories from my dad about how "wide open" Trumbull County was back in the Excellent history of organized crime in Trumbull County I grew up in Warren and was relatively aware of things. I remember hearing periodic stories from my dad about how "wide open" Trumbull County was back in the 30s and Excellent history of organized crime in Trumbull County L. S. Reed I grew up in Warren and was relatively aware of things. I remember hearing periodic stories from my dad about how "wide open" Trumbull County was back in the 30s and 40s, how there was dog-racing and slots somewhere in the county, and how "cleaning up Trumbull County" was the major issue in a state gubernatorial election (when Gov. Lausche was elected). He pointed out a house on southern Tod Ave. where "some gangster used to live" now and then. Then of course as a current event there was the murder of Mike Farah in his front yard, just a block from my grandmother's house. An. 0s, how there was dog-racing and slots somewhere in the county, and how "cleaning up Trumbull County" was the major issue in a state gubernatorial election (when Gov. Lausche was elected). He pointed out a house on southern Tod Ave. where "some gangster used to live" now and then. Then of course as a current event there was the murder of Mike Farah in his front yard, just a block from my grandmother's house. An. 0s and Excellent history of organized crime in Trumbull County L. S. Reed I grew up in Warren and was relatively aware of things. I remember hearing periodic stories from my dad about how "wide open" Trumbull County was back in the 30s and 40s, how there was dog-racing and slots somewhere in the county, and how "cleaning up Trumbull County" was the major issue in a state gubernatorial election (when Gov. Lausche was elected). He pointed out a house on southern Tod Ave. where "some gangster used to live" now and then. Then of course as a current event there was the murder of Mike Farah in his front yard, just a block from my grandmother's house. An. 0s, how there was dog-racing and slots somewhere in the county, and how "cleaning up Trumbull County" was the major issue in a state gubernatorial election (when Gov. Lausche was elected). He pointed out a house on southern Tod Ave. where "some gangster used to live" now and then. Then of course as a current event there was the murder of Mike Farah in his front yard, just a block from my grandmother's house. An. I remember it well My memories go back 60+ years. From my grandfather being a tinner and made the fenders for the first Packard cars,to being the niece of George Buchwalter, class mate of people with the last names of Camarata, Licovoli and Vecchione,to meeting Pete Licovoli. That occasion when as a young secetry, my boss wanted to borrow money from Mr. Licovoli -- his bodyguard was more impressive than he as I sat with him in the outer office. After my Uncle George passed away, I was given his effects. There was a file with newspaper clippings and a note saying he wanted to be remembered. I t

A history of organized crime in Warren and Trumbull County, featuring stories on Jimmy Munsene, the notorious Farah Brothers, Detroit Mobster Frank Cammarata, Anthony "Tony Dope" Delsanger and others.

This is May's third book. May moved on to write for Rick Porello's AmericanMafia, Court TV's "CrimeLibrary" and CrimeMagazine. May has taught classes on the history of organized crime at Cuyahoga Community College's Senior Adult Education Program and gives lectures throughout northeastern Ohio. May is the historian at Lake View Cemetery and is on its Speaker's Bureau. . May is an organized crime historian f

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